Chef Julia Child's Iconic DC Home is Renovated & For Sale

Julia Child, known for the world's first successful cooking show, The French Chef, and many cookbooks, showcased and perfected her dishes right from her home kitchen at 2706 Olive Street NW in Washington, DC.


The celebrated chef, also co-founder of the American Institute of Food & Wine in 1981, had a best-friend relationship with another celebrated chef, James Beard (of the namesake culinary awards). James was gay and the pair cherished their friendship, giving each other the same nickname of Jiji (for Juila & Jim).


Also in the 80's, Julia Child became a passionate fundraiser and activist for AIDS research. Julia passed away in 2004 and now her famous, renovated DC home is on the market. More below.


Julia Child’s cooking shows are considered an essential part of American television history. The American chef, author and television host was recognized for bringing French gastronomy to the public with the launch of her cookbook, Mastering the Art of French Cooking and with her television shows such as The French Chef.


Child lived in a beautiful house in Washington, D.C., and that's where all of her recipes for her books and shows came from. This incredible house was featured in the movie Julie & Julia, starring Meryl Streep, which tells the story of the chef's life. The property is currently on the market for $3.5 million.




A kitchen full of history

Child began cooking her famous recipes in this house beginning in 1956. Child also taught French cooking in the home to a group of women after remodeling the kitchen and installing a $400 Garland Model 182, which was a commercial gas stove with a steel griddle. Dishes taught included how to poach eggs and sauté chicken.


Today the kitchen features new stainless steel Viking appliances, an eight-burner ceramic stove, two-stack ovens, a wood-burning fireplace and a temperature-controlled wine refrigerator. Most importantly, the owner retained the original kitchen wall from the Child years, which means the kitchen still has the window featured on Child's cooking shows.



Inside a traditional house

The beautiful yellow clapboard house in Georgetown was Child's home from 1948 until she moved in a decade later with her husband Paul Child in 1959. The 19th century house was built by pioneering African-American carpenter Edgar Murphy when the neighborhood was predominantly black.



The house originally consisted of three bedrooms and three and a half bathrooms. In addition the home’s features include exposed brick and beams, an open floor plan on the first level, which houses a spacious living room, an office, a foyer, a fireplace and a powder room. But the house has been renovated multiple times which has transformed it bit by bit.


The transformation of a home

This home has undergone several renovations since it was last purchased by the current owner, Rory Veerers-Carter, in 2015. It is believed that Veerers-Carter’s grandmother was an “avid viewer of Julia’s cooking shows.” The purchase of the house came about as the owner was attracted to the enormity of the project after the house fell into disrepair and the owner worked tirelessly to preserve this iconic home.


Currently the upper level has three bedrooms. The primary bedroom has a walk-in closet with custom built-in shelves and the en-suite bathroom has a separate deep soaking tub and standing shower in toned white marble. New finishes and modern details have transformed this home, but not to worry, as the iconic details of the home remain intact, such as the kitchen.



An Iconic Kitchen

Child has been recognized as one of the top chefs in American history thanks to the impact she had on cookbooks and cooking shows. Thanks to Child’s legacy, cooking shows achieved unprecedented success. Meryl Streep was nominated for an Academy Award for playing Child in the 2009 film Julie & Julia. Child passed away in 2004 in Montecito, California, due to kidney failure, two days before her 92nd birthday. The future owner of the house is not yet known, but we are sure that he or she will be a lover of cooking and we hope they will continue to take care of the kitchen and keep it in its original state.


Source, Architectural Digest.